ancientart:

Aramaic Adoption Contract, dates to October 22, 416 B.C.E., found at Elephantine Island, Egypt, Papyrus/ ink.

This document originates in the archive of Ananiah and Tamut, members of a Jewish family living on Elephantine Island in the fifth century B.C. This contract allows a man named Uriah to adopt a boy named Jedaniah and thus free him from slavery. Adoption was one legal method used to free slaves in ancient Egypt. (x)

Courtesy the Brooklyn Museum Archives, currently on view at the Brooklyn Museum. 

ancientart:

Aramaic Adoption Contract, dates to October 22, 416 B.C.E., found at Elephantine Island, Egypt, Papyrus/ ink.

This document originates in the archive of Ananiah and Tamut, members of a Jewish family living on Elephantine Island in the fifth century B.C. This contract allows a man named Uriah to adopt a boy named Jedaniah and thus free him from slavery. Adoption was one legal method used to free slaves in ancient Egypt. (x)

Courtesy the Brooklyn Museum Archives, currently on view at the Brooklyn Museum

Reblogged from ANCIENT ART
Mordecai Ardon: Gates of Light (1953)

Mordecai Ardon: Gates of Light (1953)

poppoppopblowblowbubblegum:

see the rest of this gorgeous photo essay on the jewish community of mumbai here.

Reblogged from TUT BANANA
Light-colored, flat shofar
Germany, 1681 
Inscribed in Hebrew: ”Blow the horn on the new moon, on the full moon for our feast day.” On reverse: ”For it is a law for Israel, a ruling of the God of Jacob 5441 [1681]” (Psalms 81: 4-5).
source
Light-colored, flat shofar

Germany, 1681 

Inscribed in Hebrew: ”Blow the horn on the new moon, on the full moon for our feast day.” On reverse: ”For it is a law for Israel, a ruling of the God of Jacob 5441 [1681]” (Psalms 81: 4-5).

source

fashionsfromhistory:

Torah Crown
c.1740-1750
Italy

Exceptional for its size and precious material, this Torah crown is a rare survival of 18th-century Italian silver and a testimony to the artistic virtuosity of goldsmithing in Venice. In synagogues the scroll of the Torah, the first five books of the Hebrew Bible, is often decorated with a set of vestments and silver ornaments including a crown or finials, and a shield. The crown augments the Torah’s status as an object associated with royalty and speaks to the centrality of the Torah in Jewish life. The motifs depicted include ritual references such as priestly garments, a miniature temple, a menorah, and the Tablets of the Law, the latter engraved in Hebrew with the Ten Commandments. Such rich embellishment is indicative of the wealth and influential status of the Jewish congregation in the Venetian city state. The maker, Andrea Zambelli, is known to have made a wide range of ritual Judaica as well as religious silver for the local churches. A later inscription in Hebrew documents that this “crown of glory, and diadem of beauty” [Isaiah 28:5], was given by the philanthropist and president of the Jewish community in Padua, Gabriel Trieste, to his congregation in the mid-19th century. (The MET)

MET

fashionsfromhistory:

Torah Crown

c.1740-1750

Italy

Exceptional for its size and precious material, this Torah crown is a rare survival of 18th-century Italian silver and a testimony to the artistic virtuosity of goldsmithing in Venice. In synagogues the scroll of the Torah, the first five books of the Hebrew Bible, is often decorated with a set of vestments and silver ornaments including a crown or finials, and a shield. The crown augments the Torah’s status as an object associated with royalty and speaks to the centrality of the Torah in Jewish life. The motifs depicted include ritual references such as priestly garments, a miniature temple, a menorah, and the Tablets of the Law, the latter engraved in Hebrew with the Ten Commandments. Such rich embellishment is indicative of the wealth and influential status of the Jewish congregation in the Venetian city state. The maker, Andrea Zambelli, is known to have made a wide range of ritual Judaica as well as religious silver for the local churches. A later inscription in Hebrew documents that this “crown of glory, and diadem of beauty” [Isaiah 28:5], was given by the philanthropist and president of the Jewish community in Padua, Gabriel Trieste, to his congregation in the mid-19th century. (The MET)

MET

Reblogged from Untitled

sadly this is really happening in my country

Reblogged from Jewish Pride
vintageisrael:

Yemenite Jewish woman applying traditional make up. Israel, 1950s.

vintageisrael:

Yemenite Jewish woman applying traditional make up.
Israel, 1950s.

Reblogged from That's How It Was

vintageisrael:

Century old photos of Jerusalem.

Reblogged from That's How It Was