vintageisrael:

Century old photos of Jerusalem.

Reblogged from That's How It Was

Yiddish song : the Leviathan


Leviathan is a sea monster, which is mentioned in Hebrew Bible and the Old Testament ( Job,41-Psalms 74,104-Isaiah 127)

.”..In Jewish midrash (explanations of the Bible)) , it was held that God originally produced a male and a female leviathan, but lest in multiplying the species should destroy the world, he slew the female, reserving her flesh for the banquet that will be given to the righteous on the advent of the Messiah…..”

poppoppopblowblowbubblegum:

artist mikhail magaril illustrated tolstoy’s text with illustrations from jewish shtetl life. see the rest of the panels from his work mestechko here.

Reblogged from you taste of cherryade

fuckyeahsoftzionism:

Jewish songs from Spain.  One is in Ladino, I think, then there’s one in Hebrew with an Arabic accent.  Not really sure what it has to do with Yehuda Halevi; I think this is just stuff from the general Al Andalus period.  Someone wanna help me out?

Reblogged from Jew in a Blog

eretzyisrael:

Justo Sierra Synagogue - Mexico City

The historical synagogue in Justo Sierra was established in the early 1940s in Mexico City by Jewish immigrants from Syria , Mandatory Palestine and Greece and from Russia, Hungary, Lithuania and Poland who settled in the city’s center. It remains a part of the rich history of Mexican Jewry.

Tunisia jewish musicians, 1907

Tunisia jewish musicians, 1907

Kochbuch für die Einfache und Feine Jüdische Küche by Marie Elsasser

Kochbuch für die Einfache und Feine Jüdische Küche by Marie Elsasser

Dov Abramson: Do we have a minyan? יש לנו מניין
Artist StatementThe Gabbay (sexton) stands outside the door of the synagogue, and asks each passer-by if he has recited the Afternoon or Evening Service. He is looking to assemble a “Minyan”, ten male Jews above the age of thirteen, the quorum required to recite the public congregational prayers-Barchu, Kaddish, Kedushah. The piece “Do We Have a Minyan?” suggests an alternative minyan, more heterogeneous and less selective. In this work, ten very different individuals are assembled, who, together, comprise the prayer quorum. The work examines the tension between the vast universalism of the Biblical verse which is used—-“Save Your People,” all of them, great and small, male and female, kippah-wearer and bareheaded Jew-and the selectivity which characterizes that sexton, as the tries to gather his minyan. Are the diverse people in the photographs suitable to form a Minyan? Are they eligible for the salvation that we all desire? In short, “Do we have a Minyan?”
more works of Dov: dovabramsonstudio.com

Dov AbramsonDo we have a minyan? יש לנו מניין

Artist Statement
The Gabbay (sexton) stands outside the door of the synagogue, and asks each passer-by if he has recited the Afternoon or Evening Service. He is looking to assemble a “Minyan”, ten male Jews above the age of thirteen, the quorum required to recite the public congregational prayers-Barchu, Kaddish, Kedushah. The piece “Do We Have a Minyan?” suggests an alternative minyan, more heterogeneous and less selective. In this work, ten very different individuals are assembled, who, together, comprise the prayer quorum. The work examines the tension between the vast universalism of the Biblical verse which is used—-“Save Your People,” all of them, great and small, male and female, kippah-wearer and bareheaded Jew-and the selectivity which characterizes that sexton, as the tries to gather his minyan. Are the diverse people in the photographs suitable to form a Minyan? Are they eligible for the salvation that we all desire? In short, “Do we have a Minyan?”

more works of Dov: dovabramsonstudio.com

poppoppopblowblowbubblegum:

ketubah from bucharest, romania, 1840

poppoppopblowblowbubblegum:

ketubah from bucharest, romania, 1840

Reblogged from Untitled
Who is wise?
The one who learns from every person…
Who is brave?
The one who subdues his negative inclination…
Who is rich?
The one who is appreciates what he has…
Who is honored?
The one who gives honor to others…
Simon ben Zoma, בן זומא, Talmud - Avot 4:1 (via etzhayim)
Reblogged from Tree Of Life