fuckyeahsoftzionism:

Jewish songs from Spain.  One is in Ladino, I think, then there’s one in Hebrew with an Arabic accent.  Not really sure what it has to do with Yehuda Halevi; I think this is just stuff from the general Al Andalus period.  Someone wanna help me out?

Reblogged from Jew in a Blog

eretzyisrael:

Justo Sierra Synagogue - Mexico City

The historical synagogue in Justo Sierra was established in the early 1940s in Mexico City by Jewish immigrants from Syria , Mandatory Palestine and Greece and from Russia, Hungary, Lithuania and Poland who settled in the city’s center. It remains a part of the rich history of Mexican Jewry.

Tunisia jewish musicians, 1907

Tunisia jewish musicians, 1907

Kochbuch für die Einfache und Feine Jüdische Küche by Marie Elsasser

Kochbuch für die Einfache und Feine Jüdische Küche by Marie Elsasser

Dov Abramson: Do we have a minyan? יש לנו מניין
Artist StatementThe Gabbay (sexton) stands outside the door of the synagogue, and asks each passer-by if he has recited the Afternoon or Evening Service. He is looking to assemble a “Minyan”, ten male Jews above the age of thirteen, the quorum required to recite the public congregational prayers-Barchu, Kaddish, Kedushah. The piece “Do We Have a Minyan?” suggests an alternative minyan, more heterogeneous and less selective. In this work, ten very different individuals are assembled, who, together, comprise the prayer quorum. The work examines the tension between the vast universalism of the Biblical verse which is used—-“Save Your People,” all of them, great and small, male and female, kippah-wearer and bareheaded Jew-and the selectivity which characterizes that sexton, as the tries to gather his minyan. Are the diverse people in the photographs suitable to form a Minyan? Are they eligible for the salvation that we all desire? In short, “Do we have a Minyan?”
more works of Dov: dovabramsonstudio.com

Dov AbramsonDo we have a minyan? יש לנו מניין

Artist Statement
The Gabbay (sexton) stands outside the door of the synagogue, and asks each passer-by if he has recited the Afternoon or Evening Service. He is looking to assemble a “Minyan”, ten male Jews above the age of thirteen, the quorum required to recite the public congregational prayers-Barchu, Kaddish, Kedushah. The piece “Do We Have a Minyan?” suggests an alternative minyan, more heterogeneous and less selective. In this work, ten very different individuals are assembled, who, together, comprise the prayer quorum. The work examines the tension between the vast universalism of the Biblical verse which is used—-“Save Your People,” all of them, great and small, male and female, kippah-wearer and bareheaded Jew-and the selectivity which characterizes that sexton, as the tries to gather his minyan. Are the diverse people in the photographs suitable to form a Minyan? Are they eligible for the salvation that we all desire? In short, “Do we have a Minyan?”

more works of Dov: dovabramsonstudio.com

poppoppopblowblowbubblegum:

ketubah from bucharest, romania, 1840

poppoppopblowblowbubblegum:

ketubah from bucharest, romania, 1840

Reblogged from Untitled
Who is wise?
The one who learns from every person…
Who is brave?
The one who subdues his negative inclination…
Who is rich?
The one who is appreciates what he has…
Who is honored?
The one who gives honor to others…
Simon ben Zoma, בן זומא, Talmud - Avot 4:1 (via etzhayim)
Reblogged from Tree Of Life
Reblogged from ארץ ישראל

folksbiene:

I was also not aware that Jerome Robbins and Leonard Bernstein composed a ballet inspired by the  most famous Yiddish play of all time, S. Ansky’s The Dybbuk.

Wikipedia makes this interesting note:

In Dybbuk, Bernstein used a Kabbalistic tree to derive some of the melodic motives. By Kabbalistic tradition, each letter of the Hebrew alphabet has its own numerical value. The name of the female lead in Dybbuk, Leah, is equal to the numerical value of thirty-six. Bernstein focused his composition on the divisions of thirty-six and eighteen (the numerical value of the Hebrew word chai (חַי), meaning "life"), each multiples of the nine—the number of notes including the repetition of the top note in a symmetrical octatonic scale. The result lent itself well to dodecaphonic composition but baffled critics, causing Oliver Knussen to write in Tempo, “…it is surprising to encounter Bernstein making use of numerical formulas derived from the Kabbalah… and producing his most austerely contemporary-sounding score to date.” Jack Gottlieb commented, “The Dybbuk ballet (1974), however, marks a kind of departure for the composer since its concern with numerology results in far more hard-edged dissonant music (sometimes 12-tone) than in any of his other works.”

There’s also an opera based on the play.

brvegel:

ÁMOS, Imre
Waiting for Dawn c. 1939 Oil on canvas, 91 x 60 cm Private collection

brvegel:

ÁMOS, Imre

Waiting for Dawn
c. 1939
Oil on canvas, 91 x 60 cm
Private collection

Reblogged from Sonia from Hungary